Experiential Learning for Current Students

  • At Capital University Law School, we know that getting real-world experiences is critical to getting the most out of your legal education and differentiating yourself in the job market. Experiential learning opportunities help students take their classroom theory and apply it to the real world – teaching you how to work like a lawyer. That’s why we focus so actively on experiential learning opportunities within the Law School and in the legal community.

    Externships
    Capital University Law School’s expansive externship program offers varied opportunities for CapLaw students to earn academic credit for experience in the legal field. These site experiences with courts, government agencies, non-profits and in-house counsel offer practical experience helping attorneys perform real legal work. Alumni often serve as site supervisors and mentors for the externs. Students interested in additional information about Capital’s externship program may email the externship director, Susan Simms. More. 

    Law Review
    The Capital University Law Review enhances the legal education of participating students, who develop the critical skills of legal research, writing and analysis. In addition, each staff member of the Law Review writes an article on an important topic within the legal profession and submits it to the Review for possible publication. The Review is found in law libraries nationwide and is also available on Westlaw and Lexis. Read more information about the Capital University Law Review.

    Legal Clinics
    Capital University Law School’s Legal Clinic provides no-cost legal services to a variety of individuals who would otherwise be unable to afford legal representation. The Clinic also provides students the opportunity to develop and enhance their client counseling skills and professional ethics by representing indigent clients under the careful supervision of law professors and staff attorneys. In addition to providing a valuable service to the community, students experience directly the excitement of legal practice. More. 

    Moot Court
    Capital University Law School has a strong record of excellence in moot court competitions, which offer students practical experience performing legal research and presenting in a courtroom. Our vigorous moot court program provides students with an intense learning experience in a small group setting with strong faculty support. Alumni often serve as judges and in other capacities. Students interested in additional information may email faculty advisor Karen Rosenberg.

    Office of Professional Development
    The Law School’s Office of Professional Development supports professional development skill training, offers job search assistance and advice, and provides a variety of resources and events that prepare CapLaw students for their careers. The OPD also coordinates the Fall and Spring Recruitment Programs (OCI). To discuss available internships and to learn about the other resources available through OPD, please email Shawn Beem, Assistant Dean for Professional Development. More about our Job Posting Board and Recruiting Programs.

    Pro Bono
    The Law School’s Pro Bono Recognition Program encourages law student pro bono service by recognizing their successful completion of at least 50 hours of approved pro bono work. Pro bono legal services may include giving legal advice or resolving a legal problem through litigation, legislation, regulation, or alternative dispute resolution, but only to the extent consistent with the ethical constraints on the authorized practice of law. More. 

    Foreclosure Mediation Project
    This innovative program pairs law students with those looking for for help with the foreclosure process Professor Peggy Cordray runs this program. More.

    Student Organizations
    Capital University Law School offers a diverse array of student activities and organizations, many of which are geared toward helping students explore specialties within the legal profession, improve legal skills and develop social relationships. Affinity student organizations are available for African-American, Hispanic, female, and GLBT students and allies. The Interfaith Legal Society, Christian Law Society, Military Law Society and International Law Society bring together students with similar backgrounds and interests. In addition, there are organizations for those interested in law related to sports and entertainment, the environment, corporate law, intellectual property, and criminal law and more. More.