Academic Requirements - Capital University Law School

Academic Requirements

  • Degree Requirements
    Capital University Law School confers the degree of Juris Doctor (J.D.) after a student has passed a sufficient number of courses to have earned to earn 89 credit hours. In order to graduate, a student must maintain a 2.0 Cumulative grade point average. Credit hours are earned only for courses in which a student is awarded a grade of D or better, the grade S (satisfactory), or the transcript designation of K (transfer credit).

    Required Courses
    Certain subjects are deemed so fundamental for a complete understanding of American jurisprudence that they are required for graduation. Students must pass each of these courses to satisfy the graduation requirement. In addition, selected students must complete mandatory student support courses in order to graduate. See section 4.1.04. First and second year courses specifically required for graduation are listed below and must be taken in the year and the semester prescribed below or at the earliest possible time.
     

        Full-Time Day Student    Part-Time Day Student    Part-Time Evening Student 
    First-Year Fall     Contracts I (3)
    Torts I (3)
    Property I (3)
    Criminal Law (3)
    Legal Analysis Research and Writing I (2)
    Integrated Core Competencies (1)
     
      Contracts I (3)
    Torts I (3)
    Criminal Law (3)2
    Legal Analysis Research and Writing I (2)
    Integrated Core Competencies (1)
      Contracts I (3)
    Torts I (3)
    Property I (3)
    Legal Analysis Research and Writing I (1)
    Integrated Core Competencies (1)
    First-Year Spring     Contracts II (3)
    Torts II (2)
    Property II (3)
    Legal Analysis Research and Writing II (2)
    Civil Procedure: Rules (3)
    Integrated Core Competencies (1)

     
      Contracts II (3)
    Torts II (2)
    Legal Analysis Research and Writing II (2)
    Civil Procedure: Rules (3)3
    Integrated Core Competencies (1)
      Contracts II (3)
    Torts II (2)
    Property II (3)
    Legal Analysis Research and Writing II (2)
    Integrated Core Competencies (1)
    First-Year Summer            Criminal Law (3)
    Legal Analysis Research and Writing III (1)
     
                 
    Second-Year Fall    Constitutional Law I (3)
    Federal Personal Income Tax (3)
    Civil Procedure: Jurisdiction (3)
     
      Constitutional Law I (3)
    Property I (3)
    Civil Procedure: Jurisdiction (3)
      Constitutional Law I (3)
    Federal Personal Income Tax (3)
    Civil Procedure: Jurisdiction (3)
    Second-Year Spring    Constitutional Law II (3)
    Evidence (4)
      Property II (3)
    Constitutional Law II (3)
      Constitutional Law II (3)
    Civil Procedure: Rules (3)
    Evidence (4)
                 
    Third-Year Fall        Federal Personal Income Tax (3)
    Criminal Law (3)
       
    Third-Year Spring        Professional Responsibility (2)
    Evidence (4)
       
                 
    Third/Fourth Year    Professional Responsibility (2)
    Legal Drafting (2)
      Legal Drafting (2)   Professional Responsibility (2)
    Legal Drafting (2)


    NOTES
    1 For students entering in or after fall 2017, Property II will be 3 credit hours.
    2 Part-time day students may take this course in their third year.
    3 Part-time day students may take this course in their second year.

    Curricular Requirements for Graduation
     
    Perspective Course Requirement
    Students must complete a perspective course or seminar (minimum 2 credit hour course). [A “perspective” course is devoted to placing the study of law in a context other than what is routinely provided in required doctrinal, skills, or practice courses. A “perspective” course must provide one or more of the following four contexts: 

    1. Thematic: These course are devoted to placing the legal system or a particular legal subject in the context of a different academic theme. Course descriptions can be reducible to the following form: [thematic subject] of the law or particular substantive law; e.g., “Race and the Law,” “The Philosophy of Criminal Law.” 
    2. Interdisciplinary: These courses are devoted to placing the legal system or a particular legal subject in the context of other academic disciplines. Course descriptions can be reducible to the following form: Law and [other academic discipline]; e.g., “Law and Literature.” 
    3. Comparative: These courses are devoted to placing the legal system or a particular legal subject in the context of other legal or foreign doctrines. Course descriptions can be reducible to the following form: Comparative [doctrinal subject matter]; e.g., “Comparative Constitutional Law.” 
    4. Foreign Law: These courses are devoted to placing the legal system or particular legal subject in the context of foreign legal doctrine. Course descriptions can be reducible to the following form: [Foreign] legal system or particular legal subject matter; e.g., “”International Criminal Law." Courses satisfying this requirement are listed in registration materials each semester.

    Upper-Level Writing Requirement
    Students must fulfill the obligation of the upper-class writing requirement under the direction of a current full-time faculty member or, with the approval of the Associate Dean, a previous full-time faculty member. Students must receive, consistent with the above goals, faculty supervision and assessment of the writing experience before submitting the final version of a rigorous written work. The upper-class writing requirement may be fulfilled in any of the
    following classes:
    • Capital University Law Review (via an approved note or comment).
    • An approved research seminar, taught by a full-time faculty member. Qualifying seminars shall be determined by the Law School Administration. Such seminars shall be designated in the students' registration materials.
    • An approved course or practicum taught by a full-time faculty member. Qualifying courses and practicums shall be determined by the Academic Affairs Committee upon the request of the professor teaching the course. In considering the request, the Committee will consider both the above goals and the percentage of the course-grade assigned to the written work. On approval, such courses shall be designated in the students' registration materials. The following courses have received such approval: Appellate Advocacy Practicum and Environmental Law Practicum.
    • A course or practicum taught by a full-time faculty member, in which the normal means of grade achievement is an examination but in which the professor has granted a written work option to a maximum of five (5) students. Qualifying courses and practicums shall be determined by the Law School Administration after consultation with the professor of the course. Such courses shall be designated in the students' registration materials.
    • An independent research (course 982), by completion of an independent research paper or  independent research project To fulfill the upper-class writing requirement, independent research projects require the pre-approval of the Academic Affairs Committee. No faculty member may direct more than three independent study papers or projects per semester. Students are advised that faculty members generally are unwilling to supervise independent study for purposes of satisfying upper-class writing in the areas in which they offer upper-class writing opportunities in a seminar or course.

    For a complete review of the requirement, see Chapter 4 of the Manual of Policies and Procedures (Section 4.10).
     

    Experiential Learning Requirement 
    For students entering in or after fall 2016, they must fulfill the “Experiential Courses” Requirement.


    The requirements for graduation, the availability of courses, course content, and credit hour allocations are subject to change as the law school faculty shall determine.

    In accordance to ABA Accreditation Rule 304(c), students may not graduate in fewer than 24 and no more than 84 months.