Role of federal judiciary in society subject of Capital University Law School’s Sullivan Lecture

2/13/2013  -  The role of the federal judiciary in American society will be the subject of the 34th annual John E. Sullivan Lecture, sponsored by Capital University Law School.

This year’s lecturer is the Hon. Alex Kozinski, Chief Judge for the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit. Kozinski’s presentation will be “Apolitical or A Political Force? The Federal Judiciary’s Role in American Society.”

The free lecture will begin at 2:30 p.m. Thursday, April 4, at the Athletic Club of Columbus, 136 E. Broad St., Columbus, with a reception following Kozinski’s presentation. The event is approved for 1.5 CLEs. For complete information and registration, go to www.law.capital.edu/Sullivan/. Registration starts at 2 p.m.

According to Kozinski, the federal judiciary is world-renowned for its strength and independence. These qualities are supposed to insulate judges from the influence and interference of politics. But that’s often not the case. Drawing on recent and historical examples, Kozinski’s speech will examine the extent to which the judiciary is and isn’t free of politics. The speech will urge a return to the single most important guarantor of the rule of law: judicial self-restraint.

Kozinski was appointed United States Circuit Judge for the Ninth Circuit in 1985 and became Chief Judge in 2007. Before his appointment, he served as Chief Judge of the United States Claims Court from 1982-85, Special Counsel of the Merit Systems Protection Board from 1981-1982 and Assistant Counsel to the Office of Counsel to the President in 1981.

He was Deputy Legal Counsel in the Office of President-Elect Reagan from 1980-81. He also worked as an attorney for Covington & Burling from1979-81 and for Forry Golbert Singer & Gelles from 1977-79. He was Law Clerk to Chief Justice Warren E. Burger from 1976-77 and Law Clerk to Circuit Judge Anthony M. Kennedy from 1975-76.

He received his undergraduate degree from UCLA in 1972 and his juris doctor from UCLA Law School in 1975.