New Courses Spring 2013

  • NEW Marshall-Brennan Constitutional Literacy Seminar and Practicum (Law 935) Professor Dan Kobil:  (2 credits) 

    A new course focusing on enhancing your understanding of federal constitutional law and polishing your communication and presentation skills is available for the Spring, 2013 semester.  The Marshall-Brennan Constitutional Literacy Seminar and Practicum is a one-semester, three credit course that will be taught by Professor Dan Kobil to eight students.  Should you choose to do so (by writing a 30 page paper over the course of the semester), it can also satisfy the upper class writing requirement. The practicum will allow Capital law students an opportunity to teach junior and senior high school students in the Columbus City  Schools about constitutional issues and the decisions of the United States Supreme Court.  The course will also offer students the opportunity to engage in a more detailed study of areas of constitutional law and criminal procedure (though students ordinarily must have completed Constitutional Law 1 & 2).   

    A new course focusing on enhancing your understanding of federal constitutional law and polishing your communication and presentation skills is available for the Spring, 2013 semester.  The Marshall-Brennan Constitutional Literacy Seminar and Practicum is a one-semester, three credit course that will be taught by Professor Dan Kobil to eight students.  Should you choose to do so (by writing a 30 page paper over the course of the semester), it can also satisfy the upper class writing requirement. The practicum will allow Capital law students an opportunity to teach junior and senior high school students in the Columbus City  Schools about constitutional issues and the decisions of the United States Supreme Court.  The course will also offer students the opportunity to engage in a more detailed study of areas of constitutional law and criminal procedure (though students ordinarily must have completed Constitutional Law 1 & 2).   

    The course is comprised of two components. The first component is a two-hour seminar in Advanced Constitutional Law, primarily exploring how constitutional law affects the lives of high school students and their communities.  Topics to be covered include (but are not limited to) free speech issues in public schools, prayer in schools, searches in schools, federal efforts to ban guns near schools, and affirmative action in education.  Students will review Supreme Court case law, as well as teaching materials that have been developed by past participants in the program at other law schools, and develop creative ways to teach high school students about some of the most intriguing issues in constitutional law.   The seminar will be conducted in the same manner as a traditional law school seminar and will meet once a week for two hours each week during the entire semester (scheduled for Wednesdays, from 3:20 to 5:20 p.m. in order to allow students to teach at the schools during the day).  Students will be asked to complete reading assignments and participate in classroom discussion, and to make short presentations in class demonstrating how they might present various topics.  Students will also be required to submit a lesson plan, as well as a 15 page research paper on a topic of their choosing.  Should students desire also to satisfy the upper class writing requirement, the research paper requirement is expanded to 30 pages, with topic approval by Professor Kobil. 

    The second component of the course will be a field placement teaching constitutional issues to area high school students at Eastmoor Academy and Downtown High School.  Practicum students will be assigned to the classes in teams of two, and will be expected to complete approximately 30 hours of teaching at the high school during the course of the semester.  A Columbus High School teacher will be in attendance and monitor your classes.  Although Downtown High School is within walking distance of the law school, Eastmoor Academy is located about a ten-minute drive away on East Broad Street and so it would be helpful for students to have access to an automobile for this placement. 

    Capital University Law School is the first Ohio law school to participate in the Marshall-Brennan Constitutional Literacy Project (see, http://www.wcl.american.edu/marshallbrennan/ ). Participation in the Project allows students to be identified as a Marshall-Brennan Fellow.    This course is listed as LAW 935,  Marshall-Brennan Constitutional Literacy Seminar and Practicum (3 credits).  However, because of the small number of slots that are available for law students to teach in the high school classrooms, course enrollment will be limited to eight students selected on the basis of their interest in and aptitude for the program, and will require instructor approval.  Those who are interested in enrolling should submit their resume to Professor Kobil at dkobil@law.capital.edu, and also arrange for a brief interview, either in person or by telephone ON OR BEFORE OCTOBER 30, 2012.  Once a student has been accepted into the course, Professor Kobil will notify the Registar and the student, and the student will be registered. If you have any questions, please contact Professor Dan Kobil (dkobil@law.capital.edu ;236-6675), or Darren Nealy (dnealy@law.capital.edu ; 236-6392).